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Last updated: Thu, 22 April 2005

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Why Open Source?

(Wed, 29 May 2002)

With the future release of Tod10 (middle of June), I think it's time to answer to one of the frequently asked questions to the NO-SOD  

Imagine a world where all of the applications worked and they didn't cost you a dime. It may sound like a dream, but it's happening more and more as companies adopt the GNU Public License and make their applications code available to the Open Source developer community.

When it comes to building a better application, many companies are starting to turn to the Open Source developer community as a way to enhance their products. Open Source has gained a lot support and press in the past year, due in part to one company's bold move to release its source code to developers.

Open Source software is an idea whose time has finally come. For twenty years it has been building momentum in the technical cultures that built the Internet and the World Wide Web. Now it's breaking out into the commercial world, and that's changing all the rules.

Filll  

team: "Why Open Source?".

With the rapid growth of Linux as a production operating system, a lot of interest has been generated in "Open Source".

The basic idea behind Open Source is very simple: when programmers can read, redistribute, and modify the source code for a piece of software, the software evolves. People improve it, people adapt it, people fix bugs.

We have learned in the Open Source community that this rapid evolutionary process produces better software than the traditional closed model, in which only a very few programmers can see the source.


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